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Navigating the New Arctic (NNA): Co-production of shorefast ice knowledge in Uummannaq Bay, Greenland

General

Organisation
Project start
01.01.2018
Project end
31.12.2021
Type of project
ARMAP/NSF
Project theme
Society, economy and culture
Project topic
Cryosphere
Meteorlogy
Culture & history

Fieldwork / Study

Fieldwork country
Greenland (DK)
Fieldwork region
Greenland, Mid-West
Fieldwork location

Geolocation is 69.2166667, -51.1

Fieldwork start
25.04.2019
Fieldwork end
07.05.2019

SAR information

Fieldwork / Study

Fieldwork country
Greenland (DK)
Fieldwork region
Greenland, Mid-West
Fieldwork location

Geolocation is 67.0179977417, -50.69400024414

Fieldwork start
25.04.2019
Fieldwork end
09.05.2019

SAR information

Fieldwork / Study

Fieldwork country
Greenland (DK)
Fieldwork region
Greenland, Mid-West
Fieldwork location

Geolocation is 70.689972, -51.884603

Fieldwork start
26.04.2019
Fieldwork end
06.05.2019

SAR information

Fieldwork / Study

Fieldwork country
Greenland (DK)
Fieldwork region
Greenland, Mid-West
Fieldwork location

Geolocation is 67.0179977417, -50.69400024414

Fieldwork start
01.01.2020
Fieldwork end
31.12.2020

SAR information

Fieldwork / Study

Fieldwork country
Greenland (DK)
Fieldwork region
Greenland, Mid-West
Fieldwork location

Geolocation is 70.689972, -51.884603

Fieldwork start
01.01.2020
Fieldwork end
31.12.2020

SAR information

Fieldwork / Study

Fieldwork country
Greenland (DK)
Fieldwork region
Greenland, Mid-West
Fieldwork location

Geolocation is 67.0179977417, -50.69400024414

Fieldwork start
01.01.2021
Fieldwork end
31.12.2021

SAR information

Fieldwork / Study

Fieldwork country
Greenland (DK)
Fieldwork region
Greenland, Mid-West
Fieldwork location

Geolocation is 70.689972, -51.884603

Fieldwork start
01.01.2021
Fieldwork end
31.12.2021

SAR information

Project details

02.08.2019
Science / project summary

Shorefast ice (also known as landfast ice) is sea-ice that is attached to the coastline. Since it does not drift with the winds and currents, shorefast ice forms an important habitat for wildlife and a platform for human subsistence food production and transport in the Arctic. As the climate warms, residents local to the Arctic report that it is breaking up earlier in the year and is thinner than it was a few decades ago. These environmental changes threaten the sustainability of wildlife and traditional human activities that depend on shorefast ice. Despite its significance, a comprehensive multidisciplinary assessment of shorefast ice has yet to be made in Greenland. This project therefore seeks to understand how shorefast ice has responded to atmospheric and oceanic warming, and how these changes have affected livelihoods in communities local to the Uummannaq region of West Greenland. The results will improve institutional knowledge of environmental change in the Arctic and prediction of its associated impacts, as well as strengthen US relations in an area of, potentially global, strategic and economic importance. The project will co-produce shorefast ice knowledge by leveraging large satellite remote sensing datasets, community-based monitoring and local and Indigenous knowledge. First, observations from high-resolution optical satellite sensors will be supplemented with knowledge gathered from local residents. A community-based monitoring program will then be initiated using small multi-rotor UAVs to document key shorefast ice processes (e.g. formation and break-up) as they happen. The quantitative and qualitative shorefast ice knowledge generated by these two activities will be used to understand not only how the shorefast ice has changed but how these changes matter to individuals and communities in the Uummannaq region. The involvement of residents and institutions in Uummannaq at all stages of the project, in combination with ongoing observations, will lay the foundations for ongoing community support and enable new insights into the complex social, cultural and economic changes caused by rapid environmental change. The findings will also enhance the ability of local residents and institutions to make informed and embedded choices concerning natural resource governance and management, as well as choices about individual and collective trajectories towards a desirable and sustainable future. This award is co-funded by the Office of International Science & Engineering.

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